Maecenas sollicitudin

California, United States.

Fusce et diam ornare:

[email protected]

Sed ut sem

Nec-Vel: 9.30am To 7.00pm

Splunk multiple sourcetypes

One of the hosts sending syslog data is a Barracuda Web Filter.

Splunk Commands : How \

I would like to be able to map field names to the values in the space-delimited syslog entries that it generates. But, it looks like this is done in transforms. Am I expected to define a special sourcetype for the Barracuda?

If so, how do I assign the sourcetype via hostname or some other identifying characteristic instead of just by port number? It seems to have had no effect:.

The Secret to a Great Splunk Search

I recommend to write the syslog messages to disk with syslogd or Kiwi syslog daemon, then indexing the log files, instead of sending it straight to Splunk. This way you can easily assign different extractions to the different syslog streams based on source rather than sourcetype.

The [host::hostname] will only work if it references the hostname that is seen when the event arrives in to Splunk. If the sourcetype of data is syslogthere is a built-in transform that extracts and sets the host field from the raw event data and is what you'll see in Splunk when searching.

So, it is important to know what the host value is prior to it being transformed. You perhaps do this by disabling the transform, or using some sourcetype temporarily that does not have that transform.

As Felix mentioned, routing to different log files is a nice approach. There are many options here, it's all about finding the one that makes the most sense in your situation. We use syslog-ng running on our central splunk indexer.

We listen on a couple of different IP address we use one IP for normal syslog stuff, and the other is used for syslog events coming from cisco network devices or from our firewall. Sending the data on two different IP addresses allows us to use the standard syslog port and if volume someday goes up we can split out the work onto separate boxes.

From there we use a bunch of syslog-ng rules to place the content into different logs. Some of this is done by simple syslog filtering logic, and some of it uses host filtering and regex matching. But in the end, syslog-ng writes out basically 1 file per sourcetype. I say "basically", because in some cases I found it helpful to split the log files based on severity level, which then becomes part of the log name -- and then I setup a field extraction in splunk; which is nice when you want to only look at the more serious events.

If this is the only kind of events that are coming from that host, then doing a search-time field extraction should be an efficient option. Yes, there is a way to do this. The important caveat here is that if you are using the "syslog" sourcetype, "host" is getting extracted from the message and forced - but this is at the same time you are also trying to force the sourcetype.

Splunk doesn't know of this change yet, so you need to use the original host, sourcetype or source:. This was nice. Just what I was looking for and gives a great way to separate Syslog input. Sign In. Turn on suggestions. Auto-suggest helps you quickly narrow down your search results by suggesting possible matches as you type. Showing results for. Search instead for. Did you mean:.

Getting Data In. Ask a Question. Different sourcetypes for different syslog hosts? Scenario: Multiple hosts send syslog data to the Splunk server on UDP port I want to be able to parse each host's data in a unique way Generally, I am not allowed to send syslog data on a non-standard port Port is configured to have a sourcetype of "syslog" One of the hosts sending syslog data is a Barracuda Web Filter. It seems to have had no effect: [host::barracuda-hostname.

Tags 3. Tags: host.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie PolicyPrivacy Policyand our Terms of Service.

Stack Overflow for Teams is a private, secure spot for you and your coworkers to find and share information. I am very new to Splunk and basically been dropped in the deep end!! The out come i am trying to get is to join the queries and get Username, ID and the amount of logins. Query 2: "Successfully logged in. Like skoelpin said, I would suggest you to use the join command :. Be aware that your query might be slow, and that you should optimize your subqueries by specifying an index, like skoelpin proposed.

Learn more. Splunk how to combine two queries and get one answer Ask Question. Asked 1 year, 11 months ago. Active 11 months ago. Viewed 19k times. The queries are from diff source, sourcetype and host. James James 21 1 1 gold badge 1 1 silver badge 3 3 bronze badges. Active Oldest Votes. Akah Akah 1, 18 18 silver badges 25 25 bronze badges. Try this, it joins on User. Hey thanks for this but it still seems not to work and get error message when trying the above!!

Sign up or log in Sign up using Google. Sign up using Facebook. Sign up using Email and Password.Splunk software ships with a set of built-in source types that are known as "pretrained" source types. Splunk software can automatically recognize and assign many of these pretrained source types to incoming data.

Splunk software also includes some pretrained source types that it does not recognize automatically but that you can manually assign via Splunk Web or inputs. It is a good idea to use a pretrained source type if it matches your data, as Splunk software already knows how to properly index pretrained source types. However, if your data does not fit any pretrained source types, you can create your own source types, as described in Create source types.

Splunk software can also index virtually any format of data even without custom properties. For an introduction to source types, see Why source types matter. These are all the pretrained source types, including both those that are automatically recognized and those that are not.

See Forward data extracted from structured data files. To find out what configuration information Splunk software uses to index a given source type, you can invoke the btool utility to list out the properties.

For more information on using btoolrefer to Use btool to troubleshoot configurations in the Troubleshooting manual. The following example shows how to list out the configuration for the tcp source type:. Was this documentation topic helpful?

splunk multiple sourcetypes

Please select Yes No. Please specify the reason Please select The topic did not answer my question s I found an error I did not like the topic organization Other. Enter your email address, and someone from the documentation team will respond to you:. Feedback submitted, thanks! You must be logged into splunk. Log in now. Please try to keep this discussion focused on the content covered in this documentation topic.

If you have a more general question about Splunk functionality or are experiencing a difficulty with Splunk, consider posting a question to Splunkbase Answers. Version 6. Toggle navigation Getting Data In. What data can I index? Get started with getting data in Is my data local or remote?

Use forwarders to get data in Use apps to get data in Configure your inputs How Splunk Enterprise handles your data. How to get data into your Splunk deployment. How do you want to add data? Get data from files and directories. Monitor files and directories Monitor files and directories with Splunk Web Monitor files and directories with the CLI Monitor files and directories with inputs.

Get data from network sources. Get Windows data. Get other kinds of data in. Configure event processing. Overview of event processing Configure character set encoding Configure event line breaking Configure event timestamps Configure indexed field extraction Anonymize data.Data is the most important resource in Splunk.

Having clean data ingestion is of utmost importance to drive better insights from machine data. It is eminent that data onboarding process should not be automated and every step should be carefully done as this process can determine the future performance of your Splunk environment. Data parsing is the most important when it comes to monitoring data health in Splunk. This is the first step that is performed by Splunk when data is ingested into Splunk and indexed into different indexes.

Data parsing includes event breaking, date and time parsing, truncation, and parsing out fields that are important to the end user to drive better insights from the data. Splunk best practices recommend using these six parameters when defining every sourcetype to ensure proper parsing.

When these parameters are properly defined, Splunk indexers will not have to do spend extra compute resources in trying to understand the log files it has to ingest.

In my experience auditing Splunk environments, Date is one field that Splunk has to work the hardest to parse if it is it is not properly defined within the parameters of the sourcetype.

Sometimes when Splunk sourcetypes are not defined correctly, Splunk starts using its resources to parse events automatically and creates similar sourcetypes with a prefix number or a tag. These sourcetypes will mostly have a few events and then another one would be created. I have come across such automatically assigned sourcetypes at multiple deployments.

It becomes necessary to revisit and rectify the errors in sourcetype definition to prevent Splunk from doing this automatically. Splunk truncates events by default when they exceed 10, bytes.

There are some events that exceed that limit and are automatically truncated by Splunk. XML events generally exceed that limit. When an event is truncated before it ends, that harms the integrity of the data being ingested in Splunk.

Such events omit complete information and therefore they have no use in driving insights and skew the overall results. It is very important to always go back and monitor all sourcetypes for truncated events periodically so that any truncation errors can be fixed and data integrity can be maintained.

Event duplication is one more important area to consider when looking at data integrity. At a recent client project, I came across almost multiple hundred gigabytes of duplication in events in an environment that was ingesting almost 10 TB of data per day. Duplication of the data can be due to multiple factors and sometimes while setting inputs, the inputs can be duplicated.

Duplicate data poses a threat to the integrity of data and the insights driven from that data. Duplicate data will also take up unwanted space on the indexers. Duplication of events should also be periodically checked, especially when new data sources are on-boarded. This is to make sure that no inputs were added multiple times. This human error can be costly. At a client where we found multiple gigabytes of duplication, 7 servers were writing their logs to one NAS drive, and then the same 7 servers were sending the same logs to Splunk.

Ensuring that the areas mentioned above have been addressed and problems rectified, would be a good starting point towards a cleaner Splunk environment.

This would help save time and money, substantially improve Splunk performance at index and search time and overall help you drive better insights from your machine data. If you have questions, or would like assistance with cleansing and improving the quality of your Splunk data, please contact us:.

splunk multiple sourcetypes

Blog Splunk. Data Cleansing in Splunk. When looking at the health of data in Splunk, the following metrics are important: Data parsing Automatically assigned sourcetypes Event truncation Duplicate events Data parsing Data parsing is the most important when it comes to monitoring data health in Splunk.

Automatically assigned sourcetypes Sometimes when Splunk sourcetypes are not defined correctly, Splunk starts using its resources to parse events automatically and creates similar sourcetypes with a prefix number or a tag. Event truncation Splunk truncates events by default when they exceed 10, bytes. Duplicate events Event duplication is one more important area to consider when looking at data integrity.Now, this one bugs me for some time and this question got my attention back to this topic.

How can one compare fields over multiple source types without the use of joinappend or any other subsearch? I know, there some use cases where one has to use either of the above commands.

But I don't want to and I don't need to, so what can be done? I will show what can be done by using a run everywhere example. Let's start with the obvious one: Have you met chart? The next obvious will be: Have you met stats? Just for the record, all the above example run on my laptop and Splunk 6 for about 2.

One more thing: I know that in some use cases one is forced to use join or appendbut before that - just give stats a chance View solution in original post. HeHe that is funny, is the 'raw' text it says just give stats a chance but in the answer it is append?!??? For sure it should also say Agree this post is great. I'm slowly digesting it but I'm having a little trouble with how to extend to a three source scenario where pairs of the data match but not all three at once.

For example Name and Activity. Ultimately what I'm trying to do is to show information about the Top 10 Products for a specific City and Action. You could use eventstats to not-join the City from User to the Name from Activitythen stats by Id to not-join the Activity with the Product.

I don't understand at all what that is doing. Sign In. Turn on suggestions. Auto-suggest helps you quickly narrow down your search results by suggesting possible matches as you type. Showing results for. Search instead for. Did you mean:.

splunk multiple sourcetypes

Splunk Search. Ask a Question. Jump to solution. How to compare fields over multiple sourcetypes without 'join', 'append' or use of subsearches? MuS SplunkTrust. Hello everyone, Now, this one bugs me for some time and this question got my attention back to this topic. Tags 5. Tags: append. All forum topics Previous Topic Next Topic. Jump to solution Solution. Re: How to compare fields over multiple sourcetypes without 'join', 'append' or use of subsearches?This is an unofficial community support and discussion sub for Splunk, the big data analytics software.

Question about joining data from multiple sourcetypes self. That said, this one is bugging me. I have 2 sourcetypes. Each with there own distinct fields and values. But some of the values tend to line up.

Values like:. My hope is to take the join these sourcetypes together when searching. Either using common fields as shown above or some other way. I've been reading up on the Join command, but no dice so far.

MODERATORS

As well as writing simple queries like:. But no dice yet. So I'm a bit lost on where to go from here. If I'm following you correctly, you can simply normalize those fields to a common field name check out Splunk Common Information Model for how this is done. So for instance, you would alias "Username" in sourcetype1 to "user" and alias "username" from sourcetype2 to "user". So now, you can just look for "user" in both indexes.

However, you should always write efficient searches. After coalescing, use stats to get the results you want. Subqueries are limited to rows so you might not get full results with either of those.

splunk multiple sourcetypes

Best to call both data sources in the initial pipe, eval a common field name for your key, and merge via a stats command. It will run faster than a join and doesn't involve limits.

Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement and Privacy Policy. All rights reserved. Want to join? Log in or sign up in seconds. Submit a new link. Submit a new text post. Get an ad-free experience with special benefits, and directly support Reddit.This is an unofficial community support and discussion sub for Splunk, the big data analytics software. Manipulating data question Hey all, I am manipulating some data from multiple different indexes, I am trying to make them all uniform so we can get the best correlation.

I have been able to get all the indexes and source types under one search. I have been able to get get all data into all the columns I want. The hard part is getting all the data in these columns to look uniform. I think I will need to be using regex or eval functions to get what I want but I have been at it for about 2 or 3 hours getting no where. I'll try to explain it as best as I possibly can.

It will pull both of the data, but there are rows that are null that should be filled. I have tested this by creating a second column for the sourcetypes to confirm what should be there and that is all filled with no null columns and a third column with unique ids where I can pinpoint the null log source.

I have also tried renaming these fields to the same field and the results are the same Do you know what could cause this? I'm not exactly sure what you need from the description you've given me. But two commands that could help:.

Basically runs two searches appends the results of one to the other. It may be easier to get your fields set up how you want in some cases. It's not as efficient, especially on large datasets, but you won't notice the difference in a lot of cases. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement and Privacy Policy. All rights reserved. Want to join? Log in or sign up in seconds. Submit a new link. Submit a new text post. Get an ad-free experience with special benefits, and directly support Reddit.

Splunk join leave 7, readers 52 users here now This is an unofficial community support and discussion sub for Splunk, the big data analytics software. Have an idea for Splunk? Welcome to Reddit, the front page of the internet. Become a Redditor and join one of thousands of communities. Splunk submitted 1 day ago by ITGuyTatertot.

Subscribe to RSS

ColumnA first. I am able to get First. Last, but I wan to remove the period inbetween and move forward with First Last and get more uniform. Similar to 1 columnb Emails from multiple indexes first. I will have to add it via the original field so it doesn't add it to the email [ first. Want to add to the discussion? Post a comment! Create an account.


Faekazahn

comments so far

Mulrajas Posted on 10:12 pm - Oct 2, 2012

Sie sind bestimmt recht